The New Orleans Four: Vindicated

New Orleans FourThe truth has finally come out. The New Orleans Four were not wiretapping anyone’s phones, and they were not disabling anyone’s phones. All they were doing was telling people that they were broken, which is clearly protected by the First Amendment. You or I can lie all day long and there’s not a damn thing anyone can do about it. That’s part of the genius of America.

As I predicted, the New Orleans Four were involved in a project to expose the corruption of Sen. Landrieu and her office staff, or, in this case, the office staff. Apparently, the office voice mail was filling up with the voice mails of angry Americans voicing their discontent with Sen. Landrieu’s Louisiana Purchase deal (to buy her support for health care reform). There were so many voice mails that the system couldn’t accept any new ones, which has the effect of silencing American Patriots who are only trying to participate in our great democracy. The plan of the New Orleans Four was to pretend to be checking the phones, and then tell the office staff that they were broken. At this point they would videotape the office staff actively not caring about the American People.

Instead, the FBI (at the behest of ACORN?) arrested the New Orleans Four before they could expose the corruption and indifference of Sen. Landrieu’s office staff. And, by the transitive property of corruption, of Sen. Landrieu herself.

The FBI and law enforcement say that O’Keefe and the New Orleans Four are criminals, but O’Keefe says that he is a journalist and the truth shall set him free. That might sound odd, but he’s actually part of a long line of guerrilla journalists who have dressed up to fool people. Just think of Dan Rather in his head scarf, or Walter Cronkite dressed as an American in Vietnam.

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Comments
One Response to “The New Orleans Four: Vindicated”
  1. There is obviously a lot for me to ascertain outside of my books. Thanks for the great read,

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